Renew Membership

Dear Colleague,

Over the course of the last year the IGCS has grown in its promise as the premier global association for gynecologic oncologists and multidisciplinary team members caring for women with gynecologic malignancies. We are proud of our recent achievements and are confident you have noticed our enhancements and accomplishments.

Within the past ten months, IGCS has:

  • Hosted one our most successful Biennial Meetings in Lisbon, Portugal with over 2500 attendees
  • Redesigned and launched of a state-of-the-art website including a robust education portal and members-only section
  • Revitalized the Education Committee with truly international participation
  • Provided support to ten collaborative meetings
  • Developed and launched a global curriculum training program
  • Enhanced our relationship with our industry colleagues to ensure continued development of therapeutics for our patients
  • Recruited a seasoned and professional CEO

Help IGCS continue its mission to enhance the care of women with gynecologic cancer worldwide through education, training and public awareness.
Please submit your 2017 IGCS Membership dues today.

The IGCS relies on the strength of our membership and dues payments to remain an active and vital part of the global gynecologic cancer community. By renewing your membership, you will continue to contribute, participate and benefit from the IGCS in many ways. Without your participation, the Society could not fulfill its mission to provide you and other members with the education and resources necessary to improve the lives of women diagnosed with gynecologic cancers.

As our 2017 dues campaign comes to a close, it has come to our attention that you have not renewed your membership. We hope this is an oversight and that you will submit your dues payment by the end of February. With the launch of our new website, submitting dues online is very safe and convenient. Simply login with your email address and password at https://igcs.org/member-dues/.

Your email address is your username and all member’s passwords were reset to the default password of “unite” with the launch of the new website on October 28th. If you have changed your password since that date, use the new password you created. If you would like, Laura Snitzer, the membership services staff liaison can be reached at laura.snitzer@igcs.org. She would be happy answer any questions or set up a time and walk you through the process.

Membership offers you opportunities to engage with issues affecting the profession, connect with local and global colleagues, access top-tier educational resources and the latest insights. By paying your dues and being a member of IGCS you can assist us in shaping a brighter and stronger future for gynecologic oncology patients and their families.

We look forward to your continued participation in IGCS. We need you.

Sincerely,

 
Michael Quinn, AM, MGO
IGCS President 
 
Mary Eiken, RN, MS
IGCS CEO 

Read the Current Issue of IJGC

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IJGC is the scientific publication for topics relevant to detection, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of gynecologic malignancies. IJGC emphasizes a multidisciplinary approach, and includes original research (clinical trials and translational or basic research), reviews, and opinion pieces. The list of associate editors represents every part of the globe and all the major disciplines involved in treating cancer. Preview the current issue (February, 2017) table of contents here.

IGCS Members
Sign in to the IGCS Member Portal and click through to the Journal to gain full access to the articles.

N0t an IGCS Member?
Join today to obtain online access to IJGC.

Education Portal Launch

We are thrilled to announce that the online Education Portal is now available in the member’s section of www.igcs.org. Please view this video announcement from IGCS Education Committee Chair, Dr. Kathleen Schmeler.

To access the portal, click on the “members” button at the top right of the IGCS website, sign in and then click “Education Portal.” In the IGCS education portal, members will find:

  • Webcasts from the 2016 and 2014 Biennial Meetings
  • Surgical videos that were playing in the exhibit hall during the 2016 Biennial Meeting
  • Education Exchange videos
  • Blogs written by members of the committee providing commentary on articles published in the International Journal of Gynecological Cancers

The library of videos and resources will continue to grow over time as the IGCS Education Committee identifies and develops educational content. We hope that you find the materials in the Education Portal to be of value and we thank you for being a member of the IGCS.

Please email igcs@igcs.org for assistance.

Gynecologic Oncology News & Updates

A compilation of news articles in the field of gynecologic oncology and recent scientific studies

Retroperitoneal exploration improves survival in optimally debulked advanced epithelial ovarian cancer.

February 6, 2017: “Retroperitoneal exploration at the time of primary debulking surgery appeared to improve survival in patients with intraperitoneal stage IIIC optimally debulked epithelial ovarian cancer, according to data collected from a large multi-institutional trial.” Read more.

Dr. Levine on combos with PARP inhibitors in ovarian cancer

February 3, 2017: Dr. Douglas Levine on OncLive discusses combining PARP inhibitors with chemotherapy as well as the question of when and how to give them. View the video.

Diagnostic laparascopies can prevent future surgeries in ovarian cancer

February 1, 2017: A study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology shows that “the number of futile laparotomies was decreased in patients with advanced stage ovarian cancer who underwent diagnostic laparoscopies.” Read more.

Homologous recombination deficiency analysis predicts PARP inhibitor benefit for ovarian cancer

January 27, 2017: “Next-generation sequencing used to detect homologous recombination deficiency may predict responses to rucaparib in patients with BRCA wild-type platinum-sensitive ovarian cancers, according to results from the international, multicenter, open-label phase 2 trial ARIEL2 study.” Read more.

Lynch syndrome – associated ovarian cancer presents early, has good prognosis

January 25, 2017: An analysis of Lynch syndrome–associated ovarian cancer published in Gynecologic Oncology found that the malignancy tends to present at an early stage and has a generally good prognosis. Ovarian surveillance may be useful in some women to detect this malignancy early. Read more.

Murine study finds potential boost for ovarian cancer drug Olaparib

January 25, 2017: “Researchers have discovered that the metabolic enzyme phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (PGAM1) helps cancer cells repair their DNA and found that inhibiting PGAM1 sensitizes tumors to the cancer drug Olaparib (Lynparza). Their findings suggest that this FDA-approved ovarian cancer medicine has the potential to treat a wider range of cancer types than currently indicated.” Read more about this study.

TCGA study identifies genomic features of cervical cancer

January 24, 2017: A news release from the National Institutes of Health announces “investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have identified novel genomic and molecular characteristics of cervical cancer that will aid in the subclassification of the disease and may help target therapies that are most appropriate for each patient.” Read more.

Study pinpoints opportunity for oncologists to improve communication with patients.

January 24, 2017: A study published in the Journal of Oncology Practice looked at doctor-patient conversations and found that doctors naturally avoid difficult discussions about a challenging prognosis. This shows there may be missed opportunities to discuss what test results actually mean and allow the patient and family members to process and explore the situation. Read more.

Cervical cancer deaths rates are much higher than previously thought

January 23, 2017: “Black women are dying from cervical cancer at a rate 77% higher than previously thought, and white women are dying at a rate 47% higher, according to a study published in the journal Cancer. The study found that previous estimates of cervical cancer death rates didn’t account for women who had their cervixes removed in hysterectomy procedures, which eliminates the risk of developing the cancer.” Read more.

Endometrioid ovarian cancer presents earlier, offers better survival than serous carcinoma

January 20, 2017: “Women with endometrioid ovarian cancer present at a younger age and with earlier stage disease than those with serous ovarian cancer, according to a new analysis. The earlier presentation resulted in better 5- and 10-year overall survival rates as well.” Read more.

Countries with limited health care resources need education regarding breast cancer risk factors

January, 2017: Survey reveals there is a need for breast cancer education  in limited resource countries. Read more.

Ovarian conservation may boost outcomes in endometrial cancer

January 18, 2017: MedPage Today (free login required) writes, “Ovarian conservation was associated with decreased long-term all-cause mortality in young women with low-grade, early-stage endometrial cancer,, according to researchers.” Read more.

Why are we still talking about ‘ovarian’ cancer?

January 18, 2017: Seventy-five percent of the most deadly ‘ovarian’ cancer arises in the fallopian tubes. Should the new name for ovarian cancer be pelvic serous carcinoma? Read more.

More Chemo may not equal better outcomes in ovarian cancer

January 16, 2017: MedPage Today (free login required) writes “Increasing, the number of cycles of chemotherapy doesn’t appear to significantly influence recurrence rates or survival in patients with early stage ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCCC), according to researchers.” Read more.

Assessment identifies patients with endometrial cancer at low risk for lymph node metastasis

January 13, 2017: “Preoperative assessment of lymph node metastasis in endometrial cancer may encourage selective lymphadenectomy for low-risk patients,” according to a study by Dr. Sokbom Kang and colleagues at the Research Institute and Hospital of National Cancer Center in the Republic of Korea. Read more.

Research evaluates treatment options for pelvic organ prolapse

January 12, 2017: Recently published in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology, research “found that while women undergoing surgery or having a pessary achieve their goals and have improvements in physical, social and emotional functioning, those who underwent surgery experienced greater improvements.” Read more.

Researchers discover new subtype of cervical cancer

January 10, 2017: “A team of University of South Carolina scientists led by Carolyn Banister and Phillip Buckhaults has identified a new subtype of cervical cancer that, like most cervical cancers, is triggered by human papillomavirus (HPV) but whose growth is not directed by the virus, suggesting that therapy targeting these tumors’ distinct genomic pathways may improve patient outcomes over standard treatment.” Read more.

Read archived news stories.

Education Exchange Preview

In these recorded Education Exchange videos, listen to Drs. Michael Quinn, Usha Menon, Marie Plante, and Frederic Amant discuss issues related to gynecologic cancer in a global setting.

Dr. Michael Quinn: Gynecologic Cancer Prevention: A Reality

Dr. Usha Menon: Are We Able To Effectively Screen For Ovarian Cancer

Dr. Marie Plante: Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy For Preservation Of Fertility For Cervical Cancer

Dr. Frederic Amant: Cancer During Pregnancy

World Cancer Day

February 4th is World Cancer Day

Cancer continues to devastate peoples’ lives and destroy their futures. By 2030 it is estimated that the number of global cancer cases will rise to 21 million from 12.7 million. We in the international cancer community are very aware of the devastating statistics and the resultant significant challenges that our patients and cancer professionals face daily. Limited resources, late diagnoses, high mortality rates, and rising cancer incidence, particularly in settings that can least afford cancer care, remind us that there is still a huge amount of work to be done, especially as the cancer burden is over-represented in low economy countries.

We applaud and continue to support the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) for its ongoing efforts to raise awareness of cancer control and prevention and congratulate them for their continued efforts. IGCS as an organization has parallel goals to raise awareness of the actions needed to prevent and treat gynecologic cancers. IGCS is proud to support all the efforts being conducted in connection with World Cancer Day February 4, 2017.

While we as individuals can play our part, global, regional, and national policies and programs are needed to assist in accomplishing our collective goals.  Unless we take swift, collective action to raise awareness about cancer prevention, and practical strategies are put into place, millions of people will continue to suffer. The UICC has an excellent information tool kit for all of us to get involved and show our support locally for World Cancer Day.

We are proud to be adding our organizational resources and extensive commitment from you, our members to accomplishing our goals. We continue to make education our top priority along with training in low to middle resource areas. Our education committee will be launching our new education portal in the next several days and included in there is a wealth of gynecologic cancer information. We have posted a preview of some of our Education Exchange videos for World Cancer Day.

Our mission constantly challenges us to be an impactful organization in relieving the burden of cancer globally, and we can achieve this by extending World Cancer Day beyond one day and make it a part of our lives every day.

We invite you to join us in the journey.

 
Michael Quinn, AM, MGO
IGCS President 
 
Mary Eiken, RN, MS
IGCS CEO 

Gynecologic Oncology News Archive

A compilation of news articles in the field of gynecologic oncology and recent scientific studies

Homologous recombination deficiency analysis predicts PARP inhibitor benefit for ovarian cancer

January 27, 2017: “Next-generation sequencing used to detect homologous recombination deficiency may predict responses to rucaparib in patients with BRCA wild-type platinum-sensitive ovarian cancers, according to results from the international, multicenter, open-label phase 2 trial ARIEL2 study.” Read more.

Lynch syndrome – associated ovarian cancer presents early, has good prognosis

January 25, 2017: An analysis of Lynch syndrome–associated ovarian cancer published in Gynecologic Oncology found that the malignancy tends to present at an early stage and has a generally good prognosis. Ovarian surveillance may be useful in some women to detect this malignancy early. Read more.

Murine study finds potential boost for ovarian cancer drug Olaparib

January 25, 2017: “Researchers have discovered that the metabolic enzyme phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (PGAM1) helps cancer cells repair their DNA and found that inhibiting PGAM1 sensitizes tumors to the cancer drug Olaparib (Lynparza). Their findings suggest that this FDA-approved ovarian cancer medicine has the potential to treat a wider range of cancer types than currently indicated.” Read more about this study.

TCGA study identifies genomic features of cervical cancer

January 24, 2017: A news release from the National Institutes of Health announces “investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have identified novel genomic and molecular characteristics of cervical cancer that will aid in the subclassification of the disease and may help target therapies that are most appropriate for each patient.” Read more.

Study pinpoints opportunity for oncologists to improve communication with patients.

January 24, 2017: A study published in the Journal of Oncology Practice looked at doctor-patient conversations and found that doctors naturally avoid difficult discussions about a challenging prognosis. This shows there may be missed opportunities to discuss what test results actually mean and allow the patient and family members to process and explore the situation. Read more.

Cervical cancer deaths rates are much higher than previously thought

January 23, 2017: “Black women are dying from cervical cancer at a rate 77% higher than previously thought, and white women are dying at a rate 47% higher, according to a study published in the journal Cancer. The study found that previous estimates of cervical cancer death rates didn’t account for women who had their cervixes removed in hysterectomy procedures, which eliminates the risk of developing the cancer.” Read more.

Endometrioid ovarian cancer presents earlier, offers better survival than serous carcinoma

January 20, 2017: “Women with endometrioid ovarian cancer present at a younger age and with earlier stage disease than those with serous ovarian cancer, according to a new analysis. The earlier presentation resulted in better 5- and 10-year overall survival rates as well.” Read more.

Countries with limited health care resources need education regarding breast cancer risk factors

January, 2017: Survey reveals there is a need for breast cancer education  in limited resource countries. Read more.

Ovarian conservation may boost outcomes in endometrial cancer

January 18, 2017: MedPage Today (free login required) writes, “Ovarian conservation was associated with decreased long-term all-cause mortality in young women with low-grade, early-stage endometrial cancer,, according to researchers.” Read more.

Why are we still talking about ‘ovarian’ cancer?

January 18, 2017: Seventy-five percent of the most deadly ‘ovarian’ cancer arises in the fallopian tubes. Should the new name for ovarian cancer be pelvic serous carcinoma? Read more.

More Chemo may not equal better outcomes in ovarian cancer

January 16, 2017: MedPage Today (free login required) writes “Increasing, the number of cycles of chemotherapy doesn’t appear to significantly influence recurrence rates or survival in patients with early stage ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCCC), according to researchers.” Read more.

Assessment identifies patients with endometrial cancer at low risk for lymph node metastasis

January 13, 2017: “Preoperative assessment of lymph node metastasis in endometrial cancer may encourage selective lymphadenectomy for low-risk patients,” according to a study by Dr. Sokbom Kang and colleagues at the Research Institute and Hospital of National Cancer Center in the Republic of Korea. Read more.

Research evaluates treatment options for pelvic organ prolapse

January 12, 2017: Recently published in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology, research “found that while women undergoing surgery or having a pessary achieve their goals and have improvements in physical, social and emotional functioning, those who underwent surgery experienced greater improvements.” Read more.

Researchers discover new subtype of cervical cancer

January 10, 2017: “A team of University of South Carolina scientists led by Carolyn Banister and Phillip Buckhaults has identified a new subtype of cervical cancer that, like most cervical cancers, is triggered by human papillomavirus (HPV) but whose growth is not directed by the virus, suggesting that therapy targeting these tumors’ distinct genomic pathways may improve patient outcomes over standard treatment.” Read more.

Bush Institute’s recommendations on global health policy

January 10, 2017: The George W. Bush Institute recommends that the US continue to invest in global health initiatives such as HIV and AIDS prevention and treatment and focusing on women’s healthcare. Read more.

Diagnostic laparoscopy to reduce the likelihood of futile laparotomy

January 10, 2017: “Treatment with diagnostic laparoscopy rather than primary surgery may lower the rate of futile laparotomies among women with suspected advanced ovarian cancer according to a study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.” Read more.

New clinical trial combines two methods to defeat ovarian cancer

January 9, 2017: A new clinical trial at the University of New Mexico is testing a new approach to defeat ovarian cancer. “The clinical trial treats women whose ovarian cancer results from mutated BRCA genes. It uses one drug that kills the ovarian cancer cells and another that boosts the immune system in response to the dying cancer cells.” Read more.

ASCO updates clinical guideline to include palliative care

January 9, 2017: The key recommendation is that “Patients with advanced cancer, whether inpatient or outpatient, should receive dedicated palliative care services, early in the disease course, concurrent with active treatment.” Read more.

Study shows that BRCA status does not affect survival outcomes in young women with early breast cancer

December 25, 2016: “The study showed that patients with BRCA-positive breast cancer may safely delay bilateral mastectomy, since an immediate bilateral mastectomy within the first year of diagnosis did not affect survival.” Read more.

Endometrial cancer mutations are detectable in uterine lavage fluid before cancer is diagnosed

December 29, 2016: A press release from Newswise highlighted the findings of a study published in PLOS Medicine, “Genomic Analysis of Uterine Lavage Fluid Detects Early Endometrial Cancers and Reveals a Prevalent Landscape of Driver Mutations in Women without Histopathologic Evidence of Cancer: A Prospective Cross-Sectional Study.” Read the article.

CT-planned, high-dose-rate brachytherapy effective in cervical cancer

December 28, 2016: OncLive posted an article summarizing the results of a recent study published in Gynecologic Oncology. Lead author, Akila Viswanathan, MD, Executive Vice Chair, Johns Hopkins Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences wrote in the study: “We found that, of 9 patient characteristics and various RT prognostic factors tested in a univariate analysis, tumor size and total external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) plus BT dose were initially the most significant prognostic factors for predicting any recurrence (AR)” Read the full article.

Combination of Camptosar and Avastin safe and effective for recurrent ovarian cancer

December 27, 2016: MedPage Today reported the findings of a phase II study in the journal Gynecologic Oncology demonstrating that Camptosar and Avastin “may be a safe and effective alternative in heavily pre-treated patients with recurrent ovarian cancer, including those with prior bevacizumab and topoisomerase inhibitor use.” Read the full article.

FDA grants priority review of TESARO’s niraparib for gynecologic cancers

December 21, 2016:  “The FDA granted priority review to niraparib for the treatment of patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube or primary peritoneal cancer following response to platinum-based chemotherapy.” Read more.

Fallopian tubes may have big role to play in ovarian cancer fight

December 20, 2016: CNN posted an article noting that “research increasingly points to the likelihood that some of the most aggressive ovarian cancers originate in the fallopian tubes.” Read more.

FDA grants accelerated approval to rucaparib to treat certain types of ovarian cancer

December 19, 2016: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration granted accelerated approval to Rubraca (rucaparib) to treat “women with advanced ovarian cancer who have been treated with two or more chemotherapies and whose tumors have a specific gene mutation (deleterious BRCA) as identified be an FDA-approved companion diagnostic test.” Read the press release.  Watch this brief video of Dr. Michael Birrer discussing the treatment.

Leading cause of cancer mortality in the Caribbean region from 2003-2013

December 16, 2016: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a report stating the cancer is the second leading cause of mortality in the Caribbean region. “Among females, breast cancer was the most common cause of cancer deaths in 16 of the 18 countries for which data were reported, accounting for 14.0%–29.7% of cancer deaths, followed by cervical cancer, which accounted for 4.5%–18.2% of cancer deaths.” Read the full report.

Early surgery may increase risk of death for some uterine cancer patients

December 16, 2016: MedicalXpress.com published an article referencing a new study in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. “In the study, women who had surgery (usually to remove the uterus) within the first two weeks after diagnosis had a significantly increased risk of death within five years, compared to those who had surgery three or four weeks after their initial diagnosis.” Read the full article.

Biomarkers are a top priority in immunotherapy progress in ovarian cancer

December 13, 2016: OncLive published an article interviewing Dr. Maurie Markman regarding the importance of searching for “validated, actionable biomarkers” which “may lead to accelerated approval of…drugs, because of very high response rates in those selected populations.” Read the full interview.

FDA approves Genentech’s Avastin (Bevacizumab) plus chemotherapy for a specific type of advanced ovarian cancer

December 6, 2016: The press release notes “Approval based on two large Phase III studies including GOG-0213 that showed a five month overall survival difference for women with platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer on Avastin plus chemotherapy compared to chemotherapy alone.” Read the press release.

JAMA publishes a systematic analysis of the global burden of disease

December 3, 2016: The analysis provides global, regional and national cancer incidence and more for 32 cancer groups, including cervical, uterine and ovarian cancer from 1990-2015. The study reports that in 2015, 526,000 women developed cervical cancer worldwide, causing 239,000 deaths. In low service delivery indicator (SDI) countries, 1 in 24 women developed cervical cancer while in high SDI countries 1 in 115 women developed cervical cancer during a lifetime. Read the full analysis.

New York Times publishes article “What Not to Say to a Cancer Patient”

November 28, 2016: The New York times promotes the book “Loving, Supporting, and Caring for the Cancer Patient” which provides helpful suggestions to the friends and family members of cancer patients. Read the article.

JCO study on neoadjuvant chemotherapy

November, 2016: The Journal of Clinical Oncology, the official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)  published a study on the use and effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for the treatment of ovarian cancer.

The findings of the study “suggest that in carefully selected patients with stage IIIC disease, PCS is associated with a survival advantage, with overall low rates of surgical morbidity. In contrast, for patients with stage IV disease, … results confirm that NACT is noninferior to PCS for survival, with fewer ICU admissions and rehospitalizations, which suggests that NACT may be preferable for patients with stage IV ovarian cancer.”  Read the full JCO study.

IJGC Editor-in-Chief Search

Dear Colleague,

During the International Gynecologic Cancer Society (IGCS) biennial meeting in October, it was announced that Uzi Beller will complete his term as Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Gynecological Cancer (IJGC). In concert with the European Society of Gynaecological Oncology (ESGO), we are seeking interested candidates for the position of Editor-in-Chief. IJGCpublishes nine online issues per year, and as you know, is a peer-reviewed journal dedicated to advancing the practice of gynecological oncology worldwide by reporting novel and rigorous clinical research. The position of Editor-in-Chief for IJGC is a prestigious and honored role recognizing an individual’s proven abilities and his/her knowledge in the discipline of gynecological oncology. It also carries with it much responsibility for fulfillment of an important part of the Societies’ obligations to their membership and the gynecological oncology community as a whole.

The essential responsibilities for the position include:

  • Providing a strong editorial vision representative of the goals of the Societies and the Journal.
  • Responsibility for the scientific content of the journal, maintaining and enhancing the journal’s high standards for authoritative, innovative, and top-quality research.
  • Monitoring and ensure the fairness, timeliness, thoroughness, and civility of the peer-review editorial process.
  • Selecting and providing leadership for an esteemed international Editorial Board whose knowledge base represents the topics covered in the Editorial Mission of the Journal.
  • Collaborating with the Societies to develop strategies that advance high-quality content.
  • Ensuring proper manuscript flow to guarantee on-time publication, and soliciting content and/or editorials as appropriate.
  • Making final publishing decisions on submitted manuscripts.
The position requires the Editor-in-Chief be viewed as an expert and thought leader in gynecological oncology with a broad background in the disease and clinical medicine. Candidates should possess strong leadership qualities, intellectual vision, organizational abilities, and experience relevant to editing a leading medical journal. Candidates must possess excellent communication, organizational and interpersonal skills, and a wide network of professional contacts. A managing editor supports the Editor-in-Chief and journal operations.

The new Editor-in-Chief will officially assume responsibility for the Journal on January 1, 2019, but must be prepared to help facilitate the editorial transition beginning on September 1, 2017, as Deputy Editor. The initial term is 5 years (2019-2023), with the possibility of one extension.

Please click here for detailed information about the Journal and the role of Editor-in-Chief, along with the application process, timeline, and other pertinent information. Individuals interested in the position are encouraged to apply and complete the essential information.

We are excited about the future of IJGC and the role of a new Editor-in-Chief.

Sincerely,

 
Michael Quinn, AM, MGO
IGCS President 
 
David Cibula, MD, PhD
ESGO President 

Website Features

Dear IGCS Member,

Happy new year! Hopefully by now, you have had a chance to explore the new IGCS website since its launch October 28, 2016. Current content regarding IGCS’s programs, member benefits and partnerships is now at your fingertips on our new mobile friendly site.

Additional new web features available include:
News archive
Member Spotlight
Information for patients and the public regarding gynecologic cancers
Global events calendar
Industry partnership opportunities
Updated clinical resources from partner organizations
Featured IJGC article blogs written by IGCS thought leaders
Membership directory
Member profile
Member login to access the International Journal of Gynecological Cancer without the need to login to the publisher’s website separately

While many new features are available, we wanted to make you aware that there are several items that are still in development, which we are working to bring to you in the next several weeks. We are very excited about the great offerings that will be included in our Education Portal coming soon.

The portal will be launched in the next two weeks and will include:
• Recorded webcasts from the 2014 and 2016 Biennial Meetings
• Education Exchange videos featuring presenters providing a distillation of recent studies
• Surgical videos
• Additional featured IJGC article blogs written by IGCS thought leaders
Please make sure to check the home page often, as we update the Featured Announcements regularly.

Additionally, I would like to address the new security standards for the IGCS website. First, we recommend that all members create a strong password to protect their credit card information. Learn more about how to create a strong password.

When you login to the website, you will notice that you must check a box indicating that you are a member and then follow instructions to select several photographs before you are allowed access to the site. These “CAPTCHA” security features protect the website against hacking programs by generating tests that those hacking programs cannot pass. This ensures that your credit card information is safe and we feel that it is very important.

For the best experience, we recommend you use the most recent version of your preferred browser. Google Chrome, Safari, Mozilla Firefox and Microsoft Edge are recommended.

If you have questions or suggestions regarding the new site and its content, or have trouble logging in, please do not hesitate to email us. Thank you for your commitment to the IGCS and the care you provide to women around the globe with gynecologic malignancies.

Sincerely,

Mary Eiken, RN, MS
CEO, International Gynecologic Cancer Society

Top IJGC Articles of 2016

As the new year begins, let’s take a look back at the top viewed articles of the International Journal of Gynecological Cancer in 2016:

ESMO-ESGO-ESTRO Consensus Conference on Endometrial Cancer: Diagnosis, Treatment and Follow-up
January 2016 – Volume 26 – Issue 1 – p 2-30

 

Clinical Use of Cancer Biomarkers in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer: Updated Guidelines From the European Group on Tumor Markers
January 2016 – Volume 26 – Issue 1 – p 43-51

 

Prevalence and Predictors of Anxiety and Depression Among Cervical Cancer Survivors in Korea
August 2010 – Volume 20 – Issue 6 – p 1017-1024

 

Risk of Ovarian Cancer Relapse Score: A Prognostic Algorithm to Predict Relapse Following Treatment for Advanced Ovarian Cancer
March 2015 – Volume 25 – Issue 3 – p 416-422

 

Docosahexaenoic Acid Modulates Invasion and Metastasis of Human Ovarian Cancer via Multiple Molecular Pathways
July 2016 – Volume 26 – Issue 6 – p 994-1003