IGCS offers members the opportunity to share their stories with the greater gynecologic oncology community, inspire care givers around the world and strengthen awareness of the profession and society.

We want to hear your story!
Complete this brief online form to submit your story. Email debbie.leopold@igcs.org for assistance or more information.

Featured Members:

Mukatimui Kalima-Munalula
Women and Newborn Hospital 
Lusaka, Zambia
Fellow of the IGCS Global Curriculum & Mentorship Program

Where did you complete your training? Or tell us about your background in gyn oncology.
I was accepted into the IGCS program in 2018.

Why did you decide to pursue a career in gyn oncology or what about it interested you?
I trained as an obstetrician/gynecologist and was initially looking forward to working as an obstetrician. However, whenever I worked on the gynecology wards I noticed that few of us as doctors were interested in working with women that have gynecologic problems. Gynecologic cancers were especially not “popular.” They appeared to be the “ugly sisters” in the Cinderella story. Therefore, I was drawn to gyn oncology because I felt that if I can make a difference in one woman’s life it would be very satisfying. When I joined the fellowship, I realized that it was possible to make the difference in many women’s lives…Read more of Mukatimui’s spotlight

 

Ngoc Phan
Da Nang Oncology Hospital
Da Nang, Vietnam
Fellow of the IGCS Global Curriculum & Mentorship Program

Where did you complete your training? Or tell us about your background in gyn oncology.
I started my IGCS fellowship in February 2020 and became the second IGCS fellow in Vietnam.

Why did you decide to pursue a career in gyn oncology or what about it interested you?
I was born in Quangnam, a small province in central Vietnam, where women with gynecologic cancer diseases did not receive standard treatment yet. For this reason, I decided to enhance my knowledge and skill in gynecologic oncology.

Tell us about your work in women’s cancer: daily activities and/or special projects.
My team and I are planning a project in cervical cancer screening for low-income women in Da Nang…Read more of Ngoc’s spotlight

 

Dércia Changule
Central Hospital of Maputo
Maputo, Mozambique
Fellow of the IGCS Global Curriculum & Mentorship Program

Where did you complete your training? Or tell us about your background in gyn oncology.
Before entering the gynecologic oncology fellowship, I worked as a resident in gynecology and obstetrics at the Central Hospital of Maputo. When I was a resident in gynecology and obstetrics, I was working with patients with gynecological cancer. Most of them—about 90%— suffered from cervical cancer and were hospitalized in advanced stages where, for the most part, only palliative treatment was indicated. I saw a lot of suffering in these women.

Why did you decide to pursue a career in gyn oncology or what about it interested you?
Gynecological cancer, in particular cervical cancer, constitute a public health problem in the country. It is the cancer that causes the most death and morbidity in Mozambican women. Screening, diagnosis and treatment is very deficient, as there are no qualified surgeons to treat this group of patients, causing a lot of suffering in women. The latter encouraged me to acquire the skills in order provide adequate services to patients with this kind of cancer, and I fortunately had that opportunity with the IGCS fellowship program. I am very grateful…Read more of Dércia’s spotlight

 

Quynh Tran
Da Nang Oncology Hospital
Da Nang, Vietnam
Fellow of the IGCS Global Curriculum & Mentorship Program

Why did you decide to pursue a career in gyn oncology or what about it interested you?
Well, when I worked as a gynecologic doctor, I saw some of my patients who suffered cancer diseases and died quickly. I asked myself, “how can I treat them or at least delay their death to allow them to say goodbye to their families?” That is the reason I wanted to pursue gyn oncology.

Tell us about your work in women’s cancer: daily activities and/or special projects.
I want to share with you a screening plan that I have cherished for a long time. As a developing country, cervical cancer is the second common gynecological cancer with 7 deaths per day in Vietnam. However, cervical screening in Vietnam is currently opportunistic and findings from a survey in 2003 showed that approximately 4-6% of women across urban and rural regions have been screened. Therefore, we are working towards a new effective screening program starting first in Da Nang to target high-risk women once or twice in their lives using a highly sensitive test, with an emphasis on high coverage (> 80%) of the targeted population…Read more of Quynh’s spotlight

 

Ricardina Rangeiro
Hospital Central de Maputo
Maputo, Mozambique
Fellow of the IGCS Global Curriculum & Mentorship Program

Where did you complete your training? Or tell us about your background in gyn oncology.
I’m doing my training in Mozambique that I started in 2018. 

Why did you decide to pursue a career in gyn oncology or what about it interested you?  
I’ve always been interested in oncology and during my residency, I’ve noticed that the patients arrived in advanced stages, so I thought what could I do to make a change…Read more of Ricardina’s spotlight

 

Dawit Worku Kassa
Addis Ababa University
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Fellow of the IGCS Global Curriculum & Mentorship Program

Where did you complete your training? Or tell us about your background in gyn oncology. 
I completed three years of gyn oncology training at Addis Ababa University and completed my fellowship in January 2019. I also took the German gynecologic oncology group (AGO) licensure examination. I have been enrolled in the IGCS fellowship program since 2018.  

Why did you decide to pursue a career in gyn oncology or what about it interested you? 
I did my residency (specialization) in OBGYN at Addis Ababa University, Blacklion Hospital. During my residencyI realized there are only a few (around 5) gynecologic oncologists in the whole country and nearly all are referred to this hospital for care. The combination of scarce skilled human power with a high number of reproductive organ cancers made the waiting time unacceptably long. This is the reason why I decided to do further study in gynecologic oncology…Read more of Dawit’s spotlight

 

Saujanya Karmacharya
Civil Service Hospital
Kathmandu, Nepal
Fellow of the IGCS Global Curriculum & Mentorship Program

Where did you complete your training? Or tell us about your background in gyn oncology.
I started my IGCS fellowship in January 2019 and became the first IGCS fellow in Southeast Asia.

Why did you decide to pursue a career in gyn oncology or what about it interested you?
Before joining the IGCS fellowship, I traveled the most rural parts of Nepal for cervical and breast cancer screenings and awareness programs. I realized how women in my country are deprived of the necessary health facilities and only have access to a few gynecologic oncologists amongst which most are working centrally. After learning that we are in need of qualified gynecologic oncologists to provide qualitative treatment, I decided to join the IGCS Global Curriculum & Mentorship Program…Read more of Saujanya’s Spotlight

 

Adu Appiah-Kubi
Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi & University of Health & Allied Sciences
Ghana

Cancer on the African continent is on the increase. According to World Health Organization (WHO) data, in 2012 alone more than 8.2 million people died from cancer, and about two thirds of those were in low- and middle-income countries, the many of which are in Africa. The most common cancers in Africa are that of the cervix, breast, liver and prostate. Incidence of cancer impoverishes the sufferer and the family and is even more profound when the patient is a woman… Read more of Adu’s spotlight.